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CONTRACEPTIVE PATCH

A birth control patch you change once a week. Ideal for women who don’t want to take a pill every day.

Subscribing to EveAdam means you can buy contraceptive patches online and get them delivered as often as you need, so you never run out.

From £11.66 per month

Buy your contraceptive patch online, and get it delivered on subscription.

Not everyone who wants birth control fancies taking a pill every day. At EveAdam, we get that. So let us tell you all about the patch, and how you can take the hassle out of birth control with a set-it-and-forget-it subscription plan. Our consultations are all done online with licensed doctors, and your prescription is filled by a UK-based pharmacy — the only part that’s not online is you getting your birth control in the mail, with refills sent on a schedule you set. 

So go ahead and try us out. And if birth control in the mail isn’t your thing, we make it simple to change, pause or cancel your plan (no phone calls needed).

What is the contraceptive patch?

The birth control patch is a pretty convenient type of birth control. It doesn’t need to be fussed with every day, which gives it an edge over the pill, or inserted anywhere, which makes it simpler than the contraceptive ring. For many women, it’s the perfect option.[1]

It’s discreet too. The patch can be worn under clothing, so nobody will know that you’ve got special hormones in your bloodstream protecting you from becoming unexpectedly pregnant.

The patch is worn for a week at a time. This means you’ll change your patch on the same day every week. Don’t worry: it’s sticky enough to stay on your skin for that long, even when you shower. After three weeks of wearing patches, you’ll have a patch-free week before applying a new one and repeating the cycle.

How can I get the contraceptive patch?

Like all hormonal birth control, the patch isn’t available over the counter — you need a prescription. This is so that you have a chance to talk to a medical professional who will make sure the patch is a good choice for you specifically.

You can get the birth control patch online with EveAdam. We take your health seriously so there’s no skipping steps. You’ll still have a consultation with a licensed physician who will make recommendations based on your medical profile. We take your time seriously too, though, so your consultation happens online, and you can start right now.

If everything looks good, the clinician will issue you a prescription for the patch. That’s sent to our UK pharmacy, and they dispense and ship your medication by secure delivery (and in discreet packaging). Your patch should arrive in one working day and then refills are sent on the schedule you set.

Can I get contraceptive patches on subscription?

Yes. We know birth control isn’t a one-off, so a refill subscription is part of our service. You’ll keep getting your birth control patch delivered automatically, and you can set how often you receive your patch, whether it’s every 3, 6, 9 or 12 months.

We’ll check in with you after 12 months just to make sure the patch is working as it should and you’re happy with it. If everything is going well, the clinician will extend your prescription so your plan can continue for as long as you need it to.

How well does the contraceptive patch work?

When used correctly (as directed in the patient information leaflet that comes with your patch), it’s over 99% effective.[2] This means that within a year, out of 100 women using the patch, fewer than one of them will become pregnant.

Correct use requires taking off the patch when you need to and replacing it at the right time, including after your patch-free week is over and you’re starting a new cycle. But correct use isn’t always possible — sometimes life happens.

When life happens, it’s called ‘typical’ use. This includes forgetting to change the patch, or putting it on late, or the patch coming off by mistake. When used “typically”, the patch is still around 91% effective. So that means 9 in 100 women using it will get pregnant over a whole year.

WE OFFER [count] contraceptive patch option.

Contraceptive Patch
Evra
Norelgestromin/Ethinylestradiol

Evra

Evra patch is a once weekly skin patch that protects you against pregnancy.

YOU MAY EXPERIENCE SIDE EFFECTS WHEN USING BIRTH CONTROL.

What you need to know about the contraceptive patch.

How birth control patches work

Much like the combined pill, birth control patches contain two hormones. One is a progestogen, and the other an oestrogen. These hormones occur naturally in your body too, and they impact the motions it goes through each month to prepare itself for possible pregnancy. Here are the basics:

Ovulation is when the ovary releases an egg. If that egg is fertilized, it travels to the uterus and attaches itself to the wall to grow. The lining of the uterus (aka the endometrium) gets thicker just before this, making it easier for a fertilized egg to settle in.

The hormones in the birth control patch stay busy trying to block every part of this process. They can stop ovulation, keep the endometrium from growing thicker, and change the density of the fluid in your cervix so it’s hard for sperm to swim through. So no egg, no welcoming walls to attach to, and no fertilization.

When to start using birth control patches

Where to put the birth control patch on the body

Birth control patch side effects

What to do if the patch comes off

What birth control patches are there?

Can the birth control patch interact with other medications?

Can any woman use the birth control patch?

How can I buy birth control patches online?

References

[1] Audet, M.C. Et al. 2001. Evaluation of Contraceptive efficacy and Cycle Control of a Transdermal Patch vs an Oral Contraceptive. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/193820 [Accessed April 2nd 2021].

[2] Galzote, R.M. Et al. 2016. Transdermal Delivery of Combined oral Contraception. https://www.dovepress.com/transdermal-delivery-of-combined-hormonal-contraception-a-review-of-th-peer-reviewed-fulltext-article-IJWH [Accessed April 2nd 2021].